Mona lisa prado. The real Mona Lisa? Prado museum finds Leonardo da Vinci pupil's take 2020-01-19

The 'Prado Mona Lisa'

Mona lisa prado

Yet one replica was discovered to be of extreme importance in 2012, during a restoration effort. Details Category: Published: 26 August 2016 26 August 2016 When Museo del Prado published the feminine Mona Lisa in 2012, it was explained to the public how this painting had been stored in a warehouse for a long time and how it was never thought to have any significance related to the famous Mona Lisa. While there is no hard evidence that the same paint was used for both and there is an outstanding question as to why the frames are different, the chances of this painting having been made in the same studio seem to be quite high. These two portraits are quite different, and were executed on wood panels taken from separate tree types. Mona Lisa Artist Workshop of Year c.

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Estudio técnico y restauración de La Gioconda del Museo del Prado

Mona lisa prado

Andrew Pourciaux is a novelist hailing from sunny Sarasota, Florida, where he spends the majority of his time writing and podcasting. The black background was not part of the original painting but had instead been added to the painting as early as the 1700s. These replicas, while interesting, hold nowhere near the value of the original that inspired them. The suggestion that the Prado version was painted in the workshop of Leonardo at the same time as the Louvre version, presumably by an apprentice, is supported by the observation that it appears to have been rendered from a slightly different perspective than the original. However it may take some serious technical examinations to verify this, as by its condition it appears to be of a later date. Tests undertaken over decades on the Louvre painting have been well documented: all that is really known about the Prado copy is that a coating of black paint was removed to reveal the background.

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The 'Prado Mona Lisa'

Mona lisa prado

This second Mona Lisa was painted onto a black background, which was apparently a coat of paint applied over the original background. Mona Lisa behind bulletproof glass at the Louvre Museum. . Although there were elements that clearly distinguished the replica from the Louvre's version, the most striking point was the fact that until the restoration of the Prado's version, no landscape background was visible. Perhaps this answer should not be swallowed without chewing, however: we urge everyone to make up their own mind after finishing this study.

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The Mona Lisa and the copy in the Prado

Mona lisa prado

Information previously provided by the Prado Museum in 2010, indicated its belief that the portrait was likely painted before Leonardo left Italy for France, which would have meant that it was executed in Rome c. This possibility is plausible, given the fact that Leonardo discussed the rudiments of stereoscopic vision in his. These findings, coupled with the excellent state of preservation in regard to the Louvre's version, show the original colours of the Prado's painting and indicates what the copy must have originally looked like, as the varnish on the original has become cracked and yellowed with age. However, it usually hung in the Prado alongside masterpieces of Italian artists such as or ; a lithography of the painting also exists, which is unusual for an anonymous copy. Main article: The origins of the Prado's Mona Lisa are linked to those of Leonardo's original, as both paintings were likely created simultaneously in the same studio. Mona Lisa or The Joconde, retouched version.

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The real Mona Lisa? Prado museum finds Leonardo da Vinci pupil's take

Mona lisa prado

Without a named artist, this copy of Mona Lisa was determined to have been created in the early 16th century and appeared to have little going for it. This interesting portrait was first referred to in the 1666 inventory in the Galleria del Mediodia del Alcazar as 'Mujer de mano de Leonardo Abince' 'Leonardo da Vinci's Handy Woman'. The number 666 on the bottom left corner of the Mona Lisa del Prado The colour lapis lazuli was popular in ancient Egypt, where it was used in makeup on eyebrows and eyelids. After the restoration, it was suggested that two of Leonardo's pupils, Francesco Melzi or Salaì, were among the probable painters, though others questioned this assumption; they suggest the author could have been a Spanish student of Leonardo, namely or. However, during the 2010 restoration, researchers realized the frame's material is , an expensive wood frequently used in works of Leonardo, such as , or.

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The 'Prado Mona Lisa'

Mona lisa prado

Also remarkable in this painting is the clarity with which the transparency of the thin veil fabric is rendered, accentuating the vibrant red of the sleeves. Perhaps the greatest thing that this copy brings to the viewer is an understanding of what the original color scheme of the Mona Lisa was meant to be. Certainly if, as the Prado theorized, their copy was painted by someone sitting right next to Leonardo da Vinci, trying to duplicate his every brushstroke, then, assuming that it was begun in 1503 that artist would have had to have literally been tied to Leonardo for 16 years, while the master worked and travelled from Florence to Milan to Rome to France, and only rarely put his hand to painting: this does not make sense. With careful cleaning and restoration efforts, the real background of the painting was stunning—and it was almost identical to the background of the original Mona Lisa. That landscape was fully recovered through the restoration carried out by the Prado between 2010 and 2012, for a request to include the Prado's work in a temporary exhibition in the Louvre called Leonardo's last masterpiece: The Sainte Anne, from 29 March to 25 June 2012.

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Mona Lisa del Prado and the number 666

Mona lisa prado

These fascinating findings, coupled with the excellent state of preservation, show the original colours of the Prado painting. However, a more recent report has demonstrated that this pair in fact gives no reliable stereoscopic depth. The painting cannot be considered as a typical workshop copy due to its careful and thorough execution, as well as its use of materials such as or red. This colour is also found in Egyptian jewelry and buildings, together with the funeral mask of well-known pharaoh Tutankhamun Bongioanni, 2003. The painting has been displayed in the in since 1819, but was considered for decades a worthless copy.

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Mona Lisa (Prado's version)

Mona lisa prado

What the painting does possibly indicate, given the recent findings and expert opinions is that it would have been worked on at the same time as the Louvre version, i. Perspective Mona Lisa to the Louvre museum. The similarities between the two paintings led the team to conclude that this painting might be related to the original in some way. Museo del Prado commented that this number was not part of the original artwork, but added later and related to archiving. Since the Prado's founding in 1819, the replica has been part of its permanent collection, habitually displayed in the museum. Previous to its restoration, the painting was catalogued as an anonymous copy from the first quarter of the 16th century. During this restoration process, the copy was also submitted to a study of infrared reflectography and radiography, where the results revealed that the painting had been made in the workshop of Leonardo da Vinci at the same time as the original Mona Lisa was painted.

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Prado Museum displays unique copy of the 'Mona Lisa'

Mona lisa prado

In addition to the physical restoration, infrared scans were done on the painting to determine the history of the under-drawing changes made during the progress of painting. These scans allow for researchers to study what the artist sketched in preparation for the beginning of the painting process. However, after its restoration in 2012, the Prado's Mona Lisa was claimed to be the earliest replica of Leonardo's. Now, subsequent to the recent restoration and accompanying publicity, many new theories have been reported about its origin and execution. However, it is still unknown when the portrait entered the Spanish Royal Collection, though it could have been already in Spain in the early years of the 17th century. It differs strikingly from the other variations. Perspective Mona Lisa to the Prado museum.

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Mona Lisa del Prado and the number 666

Mona lisa prado

There has never been any suggestion that the Prado copy was painted by Leonardo. The first documentary reference was made in the 1666 inventory in the Galleria del Mediodia of the Alcazar in Madrid as Mujer de mano de Leonardo Abince Woman by Leonardo da Vinci's hand. Indeed, it is highly unlikely that the same follower of Leonardo would have shadowed the master in all his journeys for over a decade in executing this work. However, what excited the art world much more was the discovery, through infrared reflectography, of similarities in the underpainting of both this work and the Louvre portrait. This came about because it was long assumed that the copy's wooden frame was.

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